Special Needs Family Outings: What Worked (for us)

We will end the special needs family outing series with two fun posts: what worked for us when travelling near and far, and what didn’t.  I am excited to share this because as I mentioned in the first series post, we’ve done a lot of adventuring this summer! Here are a few of our travel ideas and plans that DID work for us recently or in the past.

Special needs family outings What Worked

Packing: Lists, Redundancy, and “The Question”

Kid Suitcase

The biggest concern that I have about travelling anywhere is not having a critical item during an emergency.  We combat this a few ways. First, by using a packing list and packing map that shows where everything is stored (see our free printable here).  Secondly, in addition to the fully stocked emergency bag that we take everywhere, we store duplicates of essential items in convenient places.  This includes:

*Trachs and ambu bags in June’s room, the stroller, upstairs, one under the driver’s seat of the car and one in the back of the car with the oxygen tank

*Suction catheters in the glove boxes of both cars which could be used as manual suction if the suction machine wasn’t available

*Sterile g-tube kit in June’s room and in the car

*HMEs in the suction bag and in the car console

*Extra G-tube extension and 60CC syringe in the suction bag

*When travelling out of state, I bring either our spare suction machine or a spare suction canister and tubing

And finally, Greg and I ask a quick question- The Question- anytime we venture out– “What is the most important thing we could forget?” This serves to remind us that the vast majority of forgotten items are easily replaceable on the trip, so we don’t even inquire about toiletries or small clothing items we may have missed.  This allows us to mentally check off only the “most important” things are those that can’t easily be acquired, like glasses, wallet, ID, cell phone chargers, prescription meds, and June’s specialized medical supplies.

Planning: Extra Time, Flexible Schedule, Exercise, and Breaks Alone

Dino World

We have been fortunate to take the kids on two cross-country trips in the past 2 years. They both went wonderfully, although with humorous bumps along the way which I’ll talk about in the next post- what didn’t work.  The key to enjoying long trips away from home, for us, has been building flexibility into our schedule and accommodations, including:

*Not scheduling a specific arrival time when driving so that we could stop every 2-3 hours during the day to play at local parks without feeling like we’re on the clock (Oh how Google maps has changed this aspect of vacation as compared to my childhood; at any moment we chose, we could navigate to the nearest park, some of which were tiny neighborhood playgrounds that we never guessed were there.)

*Extending our first trip by one week because it was going so well; there was a $100 fee to change the flight date, but we viewed it as an incredible bargain for a whole extra week of vacation.

*Extending the drive time home on our recent trip by one day (and an extra hotel stay), knowing that there were several sights we wanted to see along the way (like Dino World, which was awesome!) and that we would be tired from the exertions during the vacation

 

*Ensuring that, even when seeing family, we always had a private space of our own available to us to tend to the kids’ needs for naps, food, and recharging our introvert batteries.

Help: Seeking and Accepting

Beach
Rowan has a day at the beach with his grandparents

We are blessed with wonderful friends and family.  So when planning to travel, we think of ways that others could help, whether it is the family and friends we are visiting or even the hotels we use.  First, we are able to lighten our packing load by borrowing bulky items like a room humidifier, pack and play or cold weather extra clothes.  Secondly, when hazards to June are involved in the group plans, such as a trip to the pool or beach, we utilize the extra hands available to let the boys enjoy the sand and water while June plays elsewhere.  And lastly, we are grateful for extra hands when emergencies arise.  During our last trip, June unexpectedly got sick and had to go to the ER (more on that in the next post, too).  My sister, who we were visiting, gladly took Rowan for the entire day while we navigated an unfamiliar hospital system.

Electronics: Save for Last

Ghosts in the Car
The kids spent an appreciable amount of time cracking up about pretending to be ghosts early in the road trip.

This one may be relatively unique to our family, as I know many people have great success with electronics in the car; but I find that if I give the kids a phone or tablet early in the trip, they get frustrated when they can’t find or do EXACTLY what they want on it, and soon the phone is getting beaten on and thrown.  (Anyone else experience projectile iPhones while driving?)  And of course there’s the battery life issue.  In contrast, I find that the kids get a whole lot more mileage (literally) out of creative play like coloring, stickers, light bright/etch-a-sketch, and imaginary games; I think these activities are flexible enough to engage the kids pent up energy. As noted above, the kids spent about 20 minutes gleefully pretending to be ghosts.  Another time, Rowan was thoroughly amused to find that June was taking the pretend play so seriously that if he pretended to spill imaginary milk on her, she would cry urgently for a change of clothes. Reason wasn’t really helping, so Greg and I intervened by arming June with an imaginary jelly bean launcher. We all had silly fun dodging imaginary candy.  And I much prefer that to dodging non-imaginary cell phones. We find that- at least for our Safari family and the ages/stage the kids are in now- these imaginary pursuits can fill nearly an entire day of driving, and when the kids do *tire* of them, we introduce the electronics for more passive entertainment; the kids even nodded off watching their phones when they received them towards the end of our daily driving.

Those are some of the things that went *right* or have worked well for our family in our current situation.  There were plenty of hiccups thrown in as well though, some of which are pretty funny in hindsight. We’ll share those in the last post of the series: what didn’t work so well!

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